Study links higher ultra-processed food intake to increased mortality

The Statesman July 4, 2024, 10:00 AM UTC

Summary: A study presented at NUTRITION 2024 revealed a 10% higher risk of death in older adults consuming more ultra-processed foods over 23 years. The research, based on data from over 500,000 individuals, linked these foods to increased mortality from heart disease and diabetes. Highly processed meat and soft drinks were highlighted as risky subgroups. Factors like smoking and obesity did not fully explain the mortality risk.

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Magnitude8.0
Novelty4.0
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Immediacy7.0
Positivity1.0
Probability9.0
Credibility8.8

Timeline:

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